Back in 2003 when Ski-Doo came out with their industry-changing REV rider-forward platform, it was pretty much an experiment into uncharted waters. Little did...

Back in 2003 when Ski-Doo came out with their industry-changing REV rider-forward platform, it was pretty much an experiment into uncharted waters. Little did they know it would be the start of a true revolution in how a snowmobile was built and where the rider would sit.
With the success of the REV platform came not only a return to the top of the snowmobile market, but the realization that the REV only was the beginning. The REV moved the rider forward, but also revealed the limitations of the first rider forward platform. Ski-Doo engineers quickly set their sights on making an all-new platform with rider-forward ergonomics as part of the equation right from the get-go. Those efforts brought us the XP platform for 2008, their two-stroke chassis that kept the rider in a centered position for excellent bump isolation and handling, but with a complete rework of all systems to make the platform as light as possible. 2009 brought us phase two of the master plan with the introduction of the 1200cc 4-TEC engine and the XR platform variation of the XP, specifically to house the physically larger 4-stroke engine, and the REV-XU variant designed for the utility market sleds.
2010 marks the completion of the XP conversion from the REV platform with the introduction of more REV-XU models and the conversion of their fan-cooled sleds from the REV to the XP family of platforms. Here we find a host of 550 fan-cooled sleds from a 550 Renegade to all-new Tundra models to a new MX Z TNT 550 Fan, along with many others.
A rapid conversion like this is enabled by the S-E-T nature of the platform construction and design; each platform consists of interchangeable Suspension, Engine and Tunnel modules. Depending on the application, Ski-Doo uses the right combination of the three modules and wraps them in uniquely styled body panels. This kind of modular design and construction not only let them convert their entire line-up in three short years, it also saves overall manufacturing and design costs as well.  . . . .

This article was printed in SnowTech Magazine’s March 2009 issue. To read the full article, subscribe to SnowTech and we’ll mail you a copy of the March issue free to get you started. Just fill out the subscription form and enter the words “March 2009” in the comments field. We’ll mail you the March issue right away and you’ll receive 5 issues a year of the best magazine in the sport.

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