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As many of you discovered last season, the snow was deep out west last year.  Every ride we went on seemed to have 2...

As many of you discovered last season, the snow was deep out west last year.  Every ride we went on seemed to have 2 feet or more of fresh, light powder snow. It was great riding, but it really worked the sleds hard. Air intakes would plug, underhood heat would skyrocket, and the exhaust would try to cap off. This would all lead to the sled falling on its face (losing rpm) and not going as far as it was really capable of.

  1. Adding as much intake surface area as possible. High Flow intakes really helped out here.
  2. Venting the chassis for more cold air entrance and hot air escape.  A lot of new manufactures sprung up last year all doing similar kits.  We have found this really helps especially in these deep snow conditions.
  3. Sealing the exhaust system at all of the joints and most importantly from the silencer outlet to the bellypan with Ultra-Black silicone. We have found that Ultra-Black works best for this.  It seems like we tell you about this every year, but deep snow riders who fail to seal their exhaust system up will be drawing this exhaust into the airbox, especially when the intake starts to plug.  In turn, the sled will fall flat on its face because there is no oxygen in the exhausted air.  The number of mountain riders who fail to perform this step each season is huge.

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