While most of us are aware of the EPA requirements to reduce carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon emissions from snowmobiles starting with the 2006...

While most of us are aware of the EPA requirements to reduce carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon emissions from snowmobiles starting with the 2006 model year, few have heard of, or are aware of the new “fuel tank permeation” requirements. That’s right. If you’ve removed the gas cap and noticed what looks like a “liner” on the inside of your new sled’s gas tank, this is what we’re talking about.

Seems the EPA wants less fuel to “evaporate” through the fuel tank. Uh huh. As fuel sits in a plastic storage device, the plastic actually “breathes” and allows some fuel vapors to escape into the atmosphere. By using better materials, permeation of fuel through fuel tanks and hoses into the atmosphere will be reduced. The larger benefit to the average snowmobiler is how these changes should noticeably reduce the smell of gasoline coming from your snowmobile. That would be nice.
According to the EPA, the permeation requirement should only cost about $10 per machine, which should be offset by fuel savings.

One solution to this problem is offered by GE Plastics – Xenoy Resins. These new Xenoy resins incorporate an inherent barrier material that provides adequate permeation resistance. In simple terms, use this Xenoy stuff in the plastic as you make the tank and you’re done, instead of having to coat an existing tank. It comes in both blow-molding and injection-molding resin grades, and is expected to be used in fuel tanks for lawn mowers, weed wackers, snow blowers, and most personal recreational vehicles. If you’re into making fuel tanks, visit www.geplastics.com and look for Xenoy resin.

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