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Is your new sled fitted with the Fox FLOAT Airshox? If so, the internal air spring replaces the heavy metal coil spring found on...

Is your new sled fitted with the Fox FLOAT Airshox? If so, the internal air spring replaces the heavy metal coil spring found on conventional shock absorbers. Your sled also came with a Fox air pump to make adjustments to the preload (air pressure) of the shocks.

When using this air pump to adjust your preload, there are a few tips you should know.

– First, never exceed 150 psi; there is really no reason you’d ever get close to this, unless in the extreme cases of freestyle riding.

– Pressure checks and/or changes need to be made with the front end of the sled off the ground.

– When attaching the air pump to the shock valve, do not over tighten the attachment as this can damage the seal in the pump valve.

– It takes a couple of pounds of air from the shock to fill the hose leading to the pressure gauge.

-If the shock has no air pressure, the gauge will not register any pressure. You should already know if this is the case from a low ride height due to no preload.

– The pressure should rise slowly as you stroke the pump. If it rises rapidly, the pump is not attached properly to the shock.

– The black “bleed down” valve has two functions. Pressing on it halfway provides a “coarse” adjustment of air release. Pressing on the bleed valve all the way provides a “fine” adjustment of air release.

– Both shocks should be set to the same pressure.

– When removing the pump fitting from the shock, the air being released is coming from the pump hose, not the shock itself.

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