2016 Ski-Doo sleds fitted with the brand new Pilot TS skis will, of course, be using a very different carbide runner as...

     2016 Ski-Doo sleds fitted with the brand new Pilot TS skis will, of course, be using a very different carbide runner as it is a super-narrow carbide blade that slides up and down in a slot in the ski body. The 1/4” wide narrow profile runner penetrates deeper and is “carbonitrided” for hardness and long life. This new ski design virtually eliminates darting and allows for an even lighter steering effort, along with improved fuel economy (with the blade raised).


      Replacing the runner is super easy, as all you have to do is tip the sled up, secure the sled, and remove the ski bolt (the one that holds the ski onto the spindle). Once the ski bolt is removed, all you do is pull the ski down off of the carbide runner and spindle. It slides right down and off, just give it a yank and it’ll come off.


      With the ski off you can easily see how the carbide runner is held in place with a single pin. Push the pin out and the carbide blade will drop right off. Pay attention to which end of the new blade faces forward (the tapered end with the lower pin) and set the new blade in place, insert the pin, push the ski back up onto the blade, insert the ski bolt, torque the nut to spec, done deal.


pilotTS

      The OEM stock Pilot TS carbide runner is #860 201 178 that sells for $99.99 a set, with 4” of 90 degree carbide. Ski-Doo also offers an even more durable 7” runner with 60 degree carbide that sells for $124.99 per set, but we have not had a chance to try them yet. Ski-Doo indicated this new carbide runner designed was patented, so we are not sure if they will be the only ones supplying replacement runners or if any of the aftermarket companies will be issued a license to also offer them.

carbonitrided

The 1/4” wide narrow profile runner on the new Pilots TS skis penetrates deeper and is “carbonitrided” for hardness and long life. Carbonitriding is a metallurgical surface modification technique that is used to increase the surface hardness of a metal, thereby reducing wear. During the process, atoms of carbon and nitrogen diffuse interstitially into the metal, creating barriers to slip, increasing the hardness and modulus near the surface.

From the November 2015 issue of SnowTech Magazine. (September 2015)

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