We’ve received several responses to the subject of damage occurring to the inside driver lugs on certain Arctic Cat models. This was the subject...

We’ve received several responses to the subject of damage occurring to the inside driver lugs on certain Arctic Cat models. This was the subject of a “Dear Ralph” inquiry in the March issue, specifically on Powder Special long track sleds.

Dan Hoogheem states, “The problem with the track is caused by the front mount of the rear shock being placed in the down position instead of the up position. The 121″ suspensions have the swing arm in the down position and the long tracks use the up position. I hope this is clear enough for you as it is kind of hard to describe.”

Ken Spomer adds, “The track damage described from Dan Gross in the March ’06 issue sounds very similar to what I experienced. It baffled me for quite awhile as everything showed clearance all the time.

It turned out to be the front mount of the rear (rear) shock. On ACs, the shock is mounted on a pivot to allow the shock to reposition for and aft. The shock is supposed to be on top of the pivot bar and bogey wheels, but during assembly it easily fits in the incorrect down position where the shock attach point is now between the track bottom and the midpoint of the bogey wheel.

Everything works fine but on compression of the suspension the shock and the ends of the little bars that parallel the shock rub the track ‘nubs’. Hope you get what I mean.”

Delbert Vanstone indicates, “I had this problem on ’99 & ’00 Panteras. The inside rear idler wheels have a limiter strap that must be shortened to stop the suspension from inverting itself (it goes past dead center when the suspension is unloaded over a bump). When this happens it causes the rear mounting of the shock to rub off the inside drive lugs. Go over another bump and it may correct itself or it could stay in the inverted position. The correct mounting of the rear shock is in the up, not down position, relative to the inside rear idler wheels. A hole will need to be drilled in the rear limiter strap to shorten it slightly.”

Lud Habada tells us, “I have experienced the same issue after I had changed tracks. It is caused by incorrect installation of the shock support on the front cross shaft that supports the front idler wheels. The metal supports on both sides of the shock support when installed down in lieu of up will damage the inside rubber drive lugs.”

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