Dear Ralph: My friend Bob and I each have new identical 2006 Polaris 700 Classics. They have the 128″ M-10 rear suspension and the...

Dear Ralph:
My friend Bob and I each have new identical 2006 Polaris 700 Classics. They have the 128″ M-10 rear suspension and the IQ front with 6″ Woody’s carbides. We both have the same conflicting complaints of (1) Heavy steering and (2) A lot of “push” in the corners. We have both made the same adjustments (so far) to try to correct it. We realize that the heavy steering problem says “less ski pressure”, yet the pushing tells us we need “more ski pressure”.
So far we have increased the front suspension preload and shortened the limiter strap one hole. These changes have helped but we’re looking for more. (A lot of “body english” helps also as these sleds are high and rather “tippy”.) What do we do next?
Bert K. Sisson

We pretty much experienced the same issues with our 2006 Classic 700. The best thing we have found in this regard is to install a different set of skis. Try a set of SLT skis from Starting Line Products.
Polaris is relocating the ski mounts for 2007 in an effort to deal with this, effectively moving the ski forward in relation to the spindle. The end result is greatly reduced steering effort, yet we’d still like to see the handling response a notch higher yet. Being a Classic, they tend to go for a less aggressive steering response than say on a performance model.
Remember, for 2006 they changed the spindles from the 2005 models, and we suspect this relocated the skis in relationship to the rest of the sled, thus the issues you mention. In talking to Polaris development technicians, they indicated their calibration testing of the 2006 models was conducted in snow conditions that was described as “loose” groomed trails, basically “old” snow that didn’t pack and bond very well. The result was the 2006 production sleds didn’t handle quite as they had expected in varied conditions.
They have to go to all ends of the earth to find snow conditions that best replicate what you and I will be riding in. Sometimes “ideal” isn’t available at the time calibrations are being determined, and they are forced to do the best they can with what is available. I’m not trying to make excuses for them; it is a reality of new sled development that factory personnel have to work with.

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