Dear Ralph: I just wanted to share with your readers some information about Yamaha’s warranty, including their extended warranty. In 2005 I purchased a...

Dear Ralph:
I just wanted to share with your readers some information about Yamaha’s warranty, including their extended warranty. In 2005 I purchased a new Yamaha after owning Ski-Doo for years because my knees won’t let me ride a REV. I love the 4-stroke mill and the entire machine in general, until it comes to the warranty. Did you know that Yamaha dealers in Canada will not perform needed repairs under the Yamaha U.S. warranty if you bought your sled in the U.S. and have a breakdown in Canada? This goes for the first year warranty as well as the Y.E.S. extended warranty. I have had personal experience with the guys I ride with that all of the other three manufacturers honor their warranties in Canada. This can really spoil a long planned trip.

Yamaha told me that I would have to pay to have it repaired out of my own pocket then bring the receipts and parts back to the U.S. to get reimbursed for the repairs. No guarantees though! For a worldwide leader and manufacturer in the industry to refuse warranty because of a border is ridiculous. With the lack of snow in many areas some years, Canada is one of only a handful of locations people can ride; not to mention the trails, scenery and hospitality of our friends to the north make it a great snowmobiling experience. I thought your readers might want to be prepared in case they are planning a trip to Canada. Keep up the good work.
Gary Schoppenhorst
Endeavor, WI

I understand your concern, and this is due to the differences between Yamaha Motor Corporation (U.S.) and Yamaha Motor Canada. It is not a case of same company, different names for each side of the border, they are two very distinct corporations. Why this is a unique situation for Yamaha compared to the other three I do not know, but I have heard of these cases where the owner must pay for the repairs and then submit the receipts for Yamaha U.S. to reimburse them. Fortunately, with the four-stroke engines the number of such claims is quite low. Chances are you’re going to have a credit card with you if you’re from the U.S and riding in Canada, so how big of a deal is it, really? As long as you do get reimbursed in a timely manner, it shouldn’t be. A warranty is not “free service”, it is to make good on parts or workmanship which is deemed inadequate or faulty. Just because a new sled breaks during the warranty period doesn’t mean it is due to a defect.

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