Mountain riders have long been aware of the added weight from accumulating snow and ice in their tunnel and rear suspension. Hill climbers and...

Mountain riders have long been aware of the added weight from accumulating snow and ice in their tunnel and rear suspension. Hill climbers and racers alike have tried all sorts of sprays and treatments to keep the snow from sticking, thus keeping the evil weight off their sled. This is very similar to how dirt bike riders try to keep the mud from sticking and accumulating to the underside of the fenders.

One product that seems to work good in this respect (both on sleds and bikes) is Maxima SC-1 silicone detailer. It is sold primarily as a cleaner/protectant for bikes, but dries to a slick finish that dirt, ice and snow can’t get much of a grip on. The silicone content gives it this water-shedding tendency, as a dry film remains to shed the elements.

Simply spray it on to the surface to be treated, or spray onto a towel and wipe onto the surface. Give it 30 seconds and then buff for a dry sheen and incredible shine! Any ice and snow that does stick comes off much easier, as well.

This stuff is also great for cleaning and conditioning the hood and most any plastic, fiberglass or painted finish (don’t use on face shields or goggles, though).

In a pinch, racers have also been known to use a non-stick vegetable cooking spray (aerosol can) to keep ice and snow from sticking to components, usually good enough to last for the duration of an event. Try this on one-half your shovel next time it snows wet and heavy and see what happens. Could a permanent non-stick coating be applied to the inside of the tunnel on future (high-end) mountain sleds?

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